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Differentiation. 2014 Jun;87(5):183-92. doi: 10.1016/j.diff.2014.07.002. Epub 2014 Aug 15.

Adipocyte transdifferentiation and its molecular targets.

Author information

1
Division of Pharmacology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, 226031 UP, India; Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-CDRI, India.
2
Division of Pharmacology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, 226031 UP, India.
3
Division of Pharmacology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, 226031 UP, India; Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-CDRI, India. Electronic address: anil_gaikwad@cdri.res.in.

Abstract

According to the World Health Organization obesity is defined as the excessive accumulation of fat, which increases risk of other metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, etc. There are two types of adipose tissue, white and brown adipose tissue (BAT) and the latter has recently gathered interest of the scientific community. Discovery of BAT has opened avenues for a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic syndrome. BAT utilizes accumulated fatty acids for energy expenditure; hence it is seen as one of the possible alternates to the current treatment. Moreover, browning of white adipocyte on exposure to cold, as well as with some of the pharmacological agents presents exciting outcomes and indicates the feasibility of transdifferentiation. A better understanding of molecular pathways and differentiation factors, those that play a key role in transdifferentiation are of extreme importance in designing novel strategies for the treatment of obesity and associated metabolic disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Brown adipocyte; PGC1α; PRDM16; Paucilocular adipocyte; Thermogenesis; Transdifferentiation

PMID:
25130315
DOI:
10.1016/j.diff.2014.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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