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Am J Surg. 2014 Oct;208(4):550-5. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.05.009. Epub 2014 Jul 27.

Female military medical school graduates entering surgical internships: are we keeping up with national trends?

Author information

1
Walter Reed National Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; Norman M. Rich Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA. Electronic address: amy.e.vertrees.mil@health.mil.
2
Norman M. Rich Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.
3
Walter Reed National Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; Norman M. Rich Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ratios of women graduating from the only US military medical school and entering surgical internships were reviewed and compared with national trends.

METHODS:

Data were obtained from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences graduation announcements from 2002 to 2012.

RESULTS:

There were 1,771 graduates from 2002 to 2012, with 508 female (29%) and 1,263 male (71%) graduates. Female graduates increased over time (21% to 39%; P = .014). Female general surgery interns increased from 3.9% to 39% (P = .025). Female overall surgical subspecialty interns increased from 20% in 2002 to 36% in 2012 (P = .046). Women were represented well in obstetrics (57%), urology (44%), and otolaryngology (31%), but not in neurosurgery, orthopedics, and ophthalmology (0% to 20%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The sex disparity between military and civilian medical students occurs before entry. Once in medical school, women are just as likely to enter general surgery or surgical subspecialty as their male counterparts. Increased ratio of women in the class is unlikely to lead to a shortfall except in specific subspecialties.

KEYWORDS:

Female resident; General surgery; Medical student; Surgical subspecialty; Women resident

PMID:
25129429
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2014.05.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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