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Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 2014 Oct;47(5):763-78. doi: 10.1016/j.otc.2014.06.009. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Pediatric sialadenitis.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA; Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA. Electronic address: cfrancis@kumc.edu.
2
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA; Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.

Abstract

Sialadenitis in the pediatric population accounts for up to 10% of all salivary gland disease. Viral parotitis and juvenile recurrent parotitis are the two most common causes. Multiple factors, independently or in combination, can result in acute, chronic, or recurrent acute salivary gland inflammation. Sialendoscopy has emerged as the leading diagnostic technique and intervention for pediatric sialadenitis. Sialendoscopy is a safe and effective gland-preserving treatment of pediatric sialadenitis. Investigational studies are needed to address the impact of steroid instillation, postoperative stenting, and long-term outcomes of pediatric sialendoscopy. This article presents a comprehensive review of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric sialadenitis.

KEYWORDS:

Juvenile recurrent parotitis; Mumps; Pediatric sialadenitis; Salivary duct calculi; Salivary gland disease; Sialendoscopy; Sialolithiasis; Submandibular sialadenitis

PMID:
25128215
DOI:
10.1016/j.otc.2014.06.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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