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Neurology. 2014 Sep 23;83(13):1132-8. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000817. Epub 2014 Aug 15.

Long-term increased risk of unemployment after young stroke: a long-term follow-up study.

Author information

1
From the Department of Neurology, Centre for Neuroscience, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands. L.C.A.R.-J. is currently with the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
2
From the Department of Neurology, Centre for Neuroscience, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands. L.C.A.R.-J. is currently with the Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. FrankErik.deLeeuw@radboudumc.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the prevalence, excess risk, and risk factors of unemployment in patients after a TIA, ischemic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage at ages 18 through 50 years, compared with nationwide controls.

METHODS:

We performed a hospital-based cohort study among 694 patients, aged 18-50 years, with a first-ever TIA, ischemic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage. After a mean follow-up duration of 8.1 (SD 7.7) years, we used logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for being unemployed as a young stroke patient, compared with the Dutch population of vocational age (n = 7,803,000), with subsequent assessment of risk factors of unemployment.

RESULTS:

Young stroke patients had a higher risk of being unemployed than their peers in the Dutch population: women OR 2.3 (1.8-2.9), men OR 3.2 (2.5-4.0). A higher NIH Stroke Scale score at admission (OR 1.1 [95% CI 1.0-1.1]) and a longer follow-up duration (middle tertile OR 2.8 [95% CI 1.7-4.7], upper tertile OR 3.4 [95% CI 1.9-6.1]) were associated with a higher risk of being unemployed.

CONCLUSION:

Young stroke patients had a 2-3 times higher risk of unemployment after 8 years of follow-up. Return-to-work programs should be developed, adjusted, and evaluated in order to diminish the negative effects that unemployment can have on patients' life satisfaction and to limit the socioeconomic consequences.

Comment in

PMID:
25128177
DOI:
10.1212/WNL.0000000000000817
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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