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PLoS One. 2014 Aug 15;9(8):e105198. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105198. eCollection 2014.

Associations between rice, noodle, and bread intake and sleep quality in Japanese men and women.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan.
2
Department of Health Science, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.
3
Department of Community Health Nursing, School of Nursing, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan.
4
Department of Food and Human Health Science Osaka City University, Graduate School of Human Life Science, Osaka, Japan.
5
Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan.
6
School of Health Science, College of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan.
7
Department of Human Science and Fundamental Nursing, Toyama University School of Nursing, Toyama, Japan.
8
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.
9
Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have shown that a diet with a high-glycemic index is associated with good sleep quality. Therefore, we investigated the association of sleep quality with the intake of 3 common starchy foods with different glycemic indexes-rice, bread, and noodles-as well as the dietary glycemic index in a Japanese population.

METHODS:

The participants were 1,848 men and women between 20 and 60 years of age. Rice, bread, and noodle consumption was evaluated using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Sleep quality was evaluated by using the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and a global score >5.5 was considered to indicate poor sleep.

RESULTS:

Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for poor sleep across the quintiles of rice consumption were 1.00 (reference), 0.68 (0.49-0.93), 0.61 (0.43-0.85), 0.59 (0.42-0.85), and 0.54 (0.37-0.81) (p for trend = 0.015); those for the quintiles of noodle consumption were 1.00 (reference), 1.25 (0.90-1.74), 1.05 (0.75-1.47), 1.31 (0.94-1.82), and 1.82 (1.31-2.51) (p for trend = 0.002). Bread intake was not associated with sleep quality. A higher dietary glycemic index was significantly associated with a lower risk of poor sleep (p for trend = 0.020).

CONCLUSION:

A high dietary glycemic index and high rice consumption are significantly associated with good sleep in Japanese men and women, whereas bread intake is not associated with sleep quality and noodle consumption is associated with poor sleep. The different associations of these starchy foods with sleep quality might be attributable to the different glycemic index of each food.

PMID:
25127476
PMCID:
PMC4134283
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0105198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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