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Sleep Med Rev. 2015 Apr;20:59-72. doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2014.06.008. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

Sleep and exercise: a reciprocal issue?

Author information

1
Institut de recherche biomédicale des armées (IRBA), Brétigny-sur-Orge, France; Université Paris Descartes, Equipe d'accueil VIgilance FAtigue SOMmeil (VIFASOM) EA 7330, France. Electronic address: mounir.chennaoui@irba.fr.
2
Institut de recherche biomédicale des armées (IRBA), Brétigny-sur-Orge, France; Université Paris Descartes, Equipe d'accueil VIgilance FAtigue SOMmeil (VIFASOM) EA 7330, France; Laboratoire de Physiologie de l'Exercice, Université de Lyon, Saint Etienne, France.
3
Institut de recherche biomédicale des armées (IRBA), Brétigny-sur-Orge, France; Université Paris Descartes, Equipe d'accueil VIgilance FAtigue SOMmeil (VIFASOM) EA 7330, France.
4
Université Paris Descartes, Equipe d'accueil VIgilance FAtigue SOMmeil (VIFASOM) EA 7330, France; Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, APHP, Hôtel Dieu, Centre du Sommeil et de la Vigilance, Paris, France. Electronic address: damien.leger@htd.aphp.fr.

Abstract

Sleep and exercise influence each other through complex, bilateral interactions that involve multiple physiological and psychological pathways. Physical activity is usually considered as beneficial in aiding sleep although this link may be subject to multiple moderating factors such as sex, age, fitness level, sleep quality and the characteristics of the exercise (intensity, duration, time of day, environment). It is therefore vital to improve knowledge in fundamental physiology in order to understand the benefits of exercise on the quantity and quality of sleep in healthy subjects and patients. Conversely, sleep disturbances could also impair a person's cognitive performance or their capacity for exercise and increase the risk of exercise-induced injuries either during extreme and/or prolonged exercise or during team sports. This review aims to describe the reciprocal fundamental physiological effects linking sleep and exercise in order to improve the pertinent use of exercise in sleep medicine and prevent sleep disorders in sportsmen.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Insomnia; Obstructive sleep apnea; Physical activity; Review; Sleep; Sleep loss

PMID:
25127157
DOI:
10.1016/j.smrv.2014.06.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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