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Cell. 2014 Aug 14;158(4):705-721. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.05.052.

Altering the intestinal microbiota during a critical developmental window has lasting metabolic consequences.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA; Department of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA; Center for Health Informatics and Bioinformatics, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
4
Department of Microbiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
5
Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
6
Departments of Population Health (Biostatistics) and Environmental Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.
7
Department of Biology, NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
8
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536, USA.
9
New York Genome Center, New York, NY 10013, USA.
10
Department of Microbiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA; Department of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA; New York Harbor Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, New York, NY 10010, USA. Electronic address: martin.blaser@nyumc.org.

Abstract

Acquisition of the intestinal microbiota begins at birth, and a stable microbial community develops from a succession of key organisms. Disruption of the microbiota during maturation by low-dose antibiotic exposure can alter host metabolism and adiposity. We now show that low-dose penicillin (LDP), delivered from birth, induces metabolic alterations and affects ileal expression of genes involved in immunity. LDP that is limited to early life transiently perturbs the microbiota, which is sufficient to induce sustained effects on body composition, indicating that microbiota interactions in infancy may be critical determinants of long-term host metabolic effects. In addition, LDP enhances the effect of high-fat diet induced obesity. The growth promotion phenotype is transferrable to germ-free hosts by LDP-selected microbiota, showing that the altered microbiota, not antibiotics per se, play a causal role. These studies characterize important variables in early-life microbe-host metabolic interaction and identify several taxa consistently linked with metabolic alterations. PAPERCLIP:

PMID:
25126780
PMCID:
PMC4134513
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.05.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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