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Can Fam Physician. 2014 Aug;60(8):e395-404.

Systematic review of guidelines for the management of suspected lung cancer in primary care.

Author information

1
Physician with the Sunnybrook Academic Family Health Team in Toronto, Ont, and is Regional Primary Care Cancer Lead for the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network. ccopgi@mcmaster.ca.
2
Family physician in Lindsay, Ont.
3
Health Research Methodologist in the Department of Oncology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, and for Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-based Care. ccopgi@mcmaster.ca.
4
Family physician with the North York Family Health Team in Ontario.
5
Family physician in Brampton, Ont.
6
Assistant Professor in the Department of Oncology at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont.
7
Respirologist in Toronto, Ont.
8
Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Toronto and a staff radiation oncologist at Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre.
9
Associate Professor in the Division of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Toronto and Medical Director of Surgical Oncology at the Toronto East General Hospital.
10
Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University and Past Provincial Primary Care Lead at Cancer Care Ontario.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To systematically review the literature and provide an update and integration of existing peer-reviewed guidelines with recent systematic reviews and with primary studies related to the early recognition and management of lung cancer in primary care.

DATA SOURCES:

MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant articles. The quality of the evidence to support existing guideline recommendations, and the consistency of recommendations with updated evidence, were assessed. Applicability in a Canadian primary care setting was also evaluated.

STUDY SELECTION:

All studies that explored signs or symptoms of or risk factors for lung cancer in the primary care setting were included. All diagnostic studies in which symptomatic primary care patients underwent 1 or more investigations were also searched.

SYNTHESIS:

Recommendations were consistent among guidelines despite a paucity of supporting evidence. Updated evidence provided further support for the recommendations. Recommendations for identifying signs and symptoms of lung cancer presenting in primary care and for initial management can be adopted and applied within a Canadian primary care setting.

CONCLUSION:

This updated review of recommendations might help promote evidence-based practice and, ultimately, more timely management and improved prognosis for lung cancer patients. It might also assist in the development of lung cancer diagnostic assessment programs.

PMID:
25122830
PMCID:
PMC4131976
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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