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PLoS Genet. 2014 Aug 14;10(8):e1004523. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004523. eCollection 2014 Aug.

Global genetic variations predict brain response to faces.

Author information

1
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, New York, United States of America.
3
Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany; Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
5
Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
6
Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
7
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Psychiatry, Universite de Montreal, CHU Ste Justine Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
8
Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, United States of America.
9
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
10
Sir Peter Mansfield MR Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kindom.
11
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig und Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
12
School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kindom.
13
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM CEA Unit 1000 "Imaging & Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, Orsay, and AP-HP Department of Adolescent Psychopathology and Medicine, Maison de Solenn, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France.
14
University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
15
Centre National de Génotypage, Evry, France.
16
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London, United Kingdom.
17
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
18
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Neuroimaging Center, Department of Psychology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
19
Institute Pasteur, Paris, France.
20
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kindom.

Erratum in

  • PLoS Genet. 2014 Oct;10(10):e1004802.

Abstract

Face expressions are a rich source of social signals. Here we estimated the proportion of phenotypic variance in the brain response to facial expressions explained by common genetic variance captured by ∼ 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using genomic-relationship-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML), we related this global genetic variance to that in the brain response to facial expressions, as assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a community-based sample of adolescents (n = 1,620). Brain response to facial expressions was measured in 25 regions constituting a face network, as defined previously. In 9 out of these 25 regions, common genetic variance explained a significant proportion of phenotypic variance (40-50%) in their response to ambiguous facial expressions; this was not the case for angry facial expressions. Across the network, the strength of the genotype-phenotype relationship varied as a function of the inter-individual variability in the number of functional connections possessed by a given region (R(2) = 0.38, p<0.001). Furthermore, this variability showed an inverted U relationship with both the number of observed connections (R2 = 0.48, p<0.001) and the magnitude of brain response (R(2) = 0.32, p<0.001). Thus, a significant proportion of the brain response to facial expressions is predicted by common genetic variance in a subset of regions constituting the face network. These regions show the highest inter-individual variability in the number of connections with other network nodes, suggesting that the genetic model captures variations across the adolescent brains in co-opting these regions into the face network.

PMID:
25122193
PMCID:
PMC4133042
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1004523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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