Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Feb;94(2):123-30. doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000149.

Sex differences in predicting chronicity of low-back pain after acute trauma using lumbar muscle area.

Author information

1
From the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea. The new affiliation for Dr. Ryu is Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to investigate sex differences in predicting chronicity of low-back pain after acute trauma using cross-sectional areas of paraspinal (multifidus and erector spinae) and psoas muscles.

DESIGN:

Between January 2006 and December 2010, a total of 54 patients were interviewed at least 6 mos after the trauma event. The subjects were classified into chronic low-back pain group and improved low-back pain group according to the presence of low-back pain for more than 6 mos. The cross-sectional area of the multifidus, erector spinae, and psoas muscles was measured at the level of the lower margin of the L3 and L5 vertebrae using magnetic resonance imaging.

RESULTS:

The cross-sectional area of the multifidus and erector spinae muscles at L5 in the chronic low-back pain group was significantly smaller than that of the improved low-back pain group (P < 0.05) in the men. There were no significant differences in the other parameters between the groups in the men. There were no significant differences in any parameters in the women.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the men, the cross-sectional area of the multifidus and erector spinae muscles at the lower lumbar level can be considered to be prognostic factors for the chronic low-back pain after acute trauma. The authors thus suggest that strengthening of lumbar paraspinal muscles could be helpful for preventing chronicity of low-back pain.

PMID:
25122093
DOI:
10.1097/PHM.0000000000000149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center