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Nature. 2014 Oct 30;514(7524):642-5. doi: 10.1038/nature13612. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Enhanced neonatal Fc receptor function improves protection against primate SHIV infection.

Author information

1
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Building 40, Room 4502, MSC-3005, 40 Convent Drive, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-3005, USA.
2
1] Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Building 40, Room 4502, MSC-3005, 40 Convent Drive, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-3005, USA [2] Sanofi, 640 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA (R.S.R., Z.-Y.Y. and G.J.N.); Center for Genetics of Host Defense, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75235-8505, USA (M.Z.); University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy, 3500 Camp Bowie Boulevard, RES-340J, Fort Worth, Texas 76107, USA (S.R.P.).
3
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Brigham &Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
4
1] Department of Microbiology, Medical School, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street South East, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA [2] Sanofi, 640 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA (R.S.R., Z.-Y.Y. and G.J.N.); Center for Genetics of Host Defense, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75235-8505, USA (M.Z.); University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy, 3500 Camp Bowie Boulevard, RES-340J, Fort Worth, Texas 76107, USA (S.R.P.).
5
1] Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratory, Pharmacy Department, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, USA [2] Sanofi, 640 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA (R.S.R., Z.-Y.Y. and G.J.N.); Center for Genetics of Host Defense, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75235-8505, USA (M.Z.); University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy, 3500 Camp Bowie Boulevard, RES-340J, Fort Worth, Texas 76107, USA (S.R.P.).
6
Biostatistics Research Branch, Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6700A Rockledge Drive, Room 5235, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
7
Department of Microbiology, Medical School, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street South East, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.

Abstract

To protect against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) must be active at the portals of viral entry in the gastrointestinal or cervicovaginal tracts. The localization and persistence of antibodies at these sites is influenced by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), whose role in protecting against infection in vivo has not been defined. Here, we show that a bnAb with enhanced FcRn binding has increased gut mucosal tissue localization, which improves protection against lentiviral infection in non-human primates. A bnAb directed to the CD4-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein (denoted VRC01) was modified by site-directed mutagenesis to increase its binding affinity for FcRn. This enhanced FcRn-binding mutant bnAb, denoted VRC01-LS, displayed increased transcytosis across human FcRn-expressing cellular monolayers in vitro while retaining FcγRIIIa binding and function, including antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity, at levels similar to VRC01 (the wild type). VRC01-LS had a threefold longer serum half-life than VRC01 in non-human primates and persisted in the rectal mucosa even when it was no longer detectable in the serum. Notably, VRC01-LS mediated protection superior to that afforded by VRC01 against intrarectal infection with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). These findings suggest that modification of FcRn binding provides a mechanism not only to increase serum half-life but also to enhance mucosal localization that confers immune protection. Mutations that enhance FcRn function could therefore increase the potency and durability of passive immunization strategies to prevent HIV-1 infection.

PMID:
25119033
PMCID:
PMC4433741
DOI:
10.1038/nature13612
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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