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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Mar;69(3):303-8. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2014.153. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Associations of sugar-containing beverages with asthma prevalence in 11-year-old children: the PIAMA birth cohort.

Author information

1
1] Center for Nutrition, Prevention, and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands [2] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
2
Center for Nutrition, Prevention, and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
3
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Pediatric Allergology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Beatrix Children's Hospital, GRIAC Research Institute, Groningen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Recently, a few studies have linked soft drink consumption to increased asthma risk, but the contribution of different types of soft drinks is unknown. We investigated cross-sectional associations between six different types of soft drinks and asthma in 11-year-old children.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

We analyzed data of 2406 children participating in the Dutch Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort. At age 11, children self-reported consumption of sugar-added drinks, diet drinks, sweetened milk drinks, 100% fruit juice, energy drinks and sport drinks. The definition of asthma was based on parental reports of wheezing, prescription of inhaled corticosteroids and doctor's diagnosis of asthma.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of asthma in this study was 5.8%. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, asthma risk was increased for high (⩾10 glasses/week (gl/wk) versus low (<4 gl/wk) consumption of 100% fruit juice (odds ratio (OR): 2.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21-3.60), sugar-added drinks (OR: 1.56, 95%CI: 0.95-2.56) and for very high (>21.5 gl/wk) versus low (<12.5 gl/wk) total sugar-containing beverage (SCB) consumption (OR: 1.91, 95%CI: 1.04-3.48). Consumption of other beverages and consumption of fruit were not associated with increased asthma risk. No evidence for mediation of the observed associations by body mass index was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study indicates that high consumption of 100% fruit juice and total SCBs is associated with increased asthma risk in children. The positive association between consumption of 100% fruit juice and asthma is an unexpected finding that needs confirmation in future studies.

Comment in

PMID:
25117998
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2014.153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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