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Plant Sci. 2014 Sep;226:136-46. doi: 10.1016/j.plantsci.2014.06.013. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO₂] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Plant Biology, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA. Electronic address: rosentha@ohio.edu.
2
Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
3
Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
4
Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Electronic address: d-ort@illinois.edu.

Abstract

The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on (1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vc,max) and the maximum potential linear electron flux through photosystem II (Jmax), (2) the associated responses of leaf structural and chemical properties related to A, as well as (3) the stomatal limitation (l) imposed on A, for soybean over two growing seasons in a conventionally managed agricultural field in Illinois, USA. Acclimation to elevated [CO2] was consistent over two growing seasons with respect to Vc,max and Jmax. However, elevated temperature significantly decreased Jmax contributing to lower photosynthetic stimulation by elevated CO2. Large seasonal differences in precipitation altered soil moisture availability modulating the complex effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on biochemical and structural properties related to A. Elevated temperature also reduced the benefit of elevated [CO2] by eliminating decreases in stomatal limitation at elevated [CO2]. These results highlight the critical importance of considering multiple environmental factors (i.e. temperature, moisture, [CO2]) when trying to predict plant productivity in the context of climate change.

KEYWORDS:

Carboxylation; J(max); Photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency; RuBP regeneration; Stomatal limitation; V(c,max)

PMID:
25113459
DOI:
10.1016/j.plantsci.2014.06.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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