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J Adolesc. 2014 Oct;37(7):983-91. doi: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2014.07.010. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

The internalizing pathway to adolescent substance use disorders: mediation by ruminative reflection and ruminative brooding.

Author information

1
University of Washington, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 6200 NE 74th St., Ste. 110, Seattle, WA 98115, USA. Electronic address: adriam@uw.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Box 359300, CW8-6 Seattle WA 98145, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Box 351525, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
4
University of Washington, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 6200 NE 74th St., Ste. 110, Seattle, WA 98115, USA.

Abstract

Two subtypes of rumination were examined in relationship to substance use and substance use disorders in adolescents. In the 8th and 9th grade, 521 adolescents completed measures assessing depressive symptoms, conduct problems, and reflective and brooding subtypes of rumination. In 12th grade, adolescents reported substance use and were administered the substance use disorders modules from the DISC. Path analyses conducted with data from 428 participants indicated that neither depression nor rumination variables significantly affected the presence of substance use. However, indirect effects of depression through reflection and brooding were differentially related to risk of developing substance use disorders, with brooding positively associated with Marijuana Use Disorders, and reflection negatively related to both Marijuana and Alcohol Use Disorders. Pathways did not differ by sex. These findings suggest that promoting self-reflection may be an effective strategy to prevent and intervene with the development of problematic substance use.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; Brooding; Reflection; Rumination; Substance abuse

PMID:
25113394
PMCID:
PMC4171395
DOI:
10.1016/j.adolescence.2014.07.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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