Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014 Sep;35(9):1126-32. doi: 10.1086/677636. Epub 2014 Jul 25.

Infection prevention practices in neonatal intensive care units reporting to the national healthcare safety network.

Author information

1
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at high risk for healthcare-associated infections. Variability in reported infection rates among NICUs exists, possibly related to differences in prevention strategies. A better understanding of current prevention practices may help identify prevention gaps and areas for further research.

METHODS:

We surveyed infection control staff in NICUs reporting to the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) to assess strategies used to prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and central line-associated bloodstream infections in NICUs.

RESULTS:

Staff from 162 of 342 NICUs responded (response rate, 47.3%). Most (92.3%) NICUs use central line insertion and maintenance bundles, but maintenance practices varied, including agents used for antisepsis and frequency of dressing changes. Forty-two percent reported routine screening for MRSA colonization upon admission for all patients. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) use for central line care for at least 1 indication (central line insertion, dressing changes, or port/cap antisepsis) was reported in 82 NICUs (51.3%). Among sixty-five NICUs responding to questions on CHG use restrictions, 46.2% reported no restrictions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our survey illustrated heterogeneity of CLABSI and MRSA prevention practices and underscores the need for further research to define optimal strategies and evidence-based prevention recommendations for neonates.

PMID:
25111920
PMCID:
PMC4632847
DOI:
10.1086/677636
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center