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Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2015 Jan;21(1):105-13. doi: 10.1037/a0037530. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

Mild test anxiety influences neurocognitive performance among African Americans and European Americans: identifying interfering and facilitating sources.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences.
2
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
3
Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare System.

Abstract

The current study examined ethnic/racial differences in test-related anxiety and its relationship to neurocognitive performance in a community sample of African American (n = 40) and European American (n = 36) adults. The authors hypothesized the following: (a) Test-anxiety related to negative performance evaluation would be associated with lower neurocognitive performance, whereas anxiety unrelated to negative evaluation would be associated with higher neurocognitive performance. (b) African American participants would report higher levels of anxiety about negative performance evaluation than European Americans. (c) European Americans would report higher levels of anxiety unrelated to negative performance evaluation. The first two hypotheses were supported: Ethnic/racial differences in test-taking anxiety emerged such that African Americans reported significantly higher levels of negative performance evaluation, which was associated with lower cognitive performance. The third hypothesis was not supported: African Americans and European Americans reported similar levels of test-anxiety unrelated to negative evaluation.

PMID:
25111554
PMCID:
PMC5567740
DOI:
10.1037/a0037530
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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