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Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Aug 7;15(2):123-38. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2014.07.012.

Repair and regeneration of the respiratory system: complexity, plasticity, and mechanisms of lung stem cell function.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, Duke Medicine, Durham, NC 27705, USA. Electronic address: brigid.hogan@duke.edu.
2
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Duke Medicine, Durham, NC 27705, USA.
3
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
4
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.
6
Departments of Anesthesiology and Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
7
Department of Cell Biology, Duke Medicine, Durham, NC 27705, USA.
8
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
9
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
10
Perleman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
11
Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.
12
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
13
Section of Neonatology, Perinatal and Pulmonary Biology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.
14
Departments of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: emorrise@mail.med.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Respiratory disease is the third leading cause of death in the industrialized world. Consequently, the trachea, lungs, and cardiopulmonary vasculature have been the focus of extensive investigations. Recent studies have provided new information about the mechanisms driving lung development and differentiation. However, there is still much to learn about the ability of the adult respiratory system to undergo repair and to replace cells lost in response to injury and disease. This Review highlights the multiple stem/progenitor populations in different regions of the adult lung, the plasticity of their behavior in injury models, and molecular pathways that support homeostasis and repair.

PMID:
25105578
PMCID:
PMC4212493
DOI:
10.1016/j.stem.2014.07.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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