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Science. 2014 Aug 8;345(6197):1255215. doi: 10.1126/science.1255215.

Plant development. Integration of growth and patterning during vascular tissue formation in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands.
2
LifeGlimmer GmbH, Markelstrasse 38, 12163 Berlin, Germany. Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Faculty of Biology, Plant Biotechnology, Schaenzlestrasse 1, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany. Laboratory of Systems and Synthetic Biology, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands.
3
Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC), Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, SLU, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden. Laboratory of Growth Regulators, Centre of the Region Haná for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Palacký University and Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, Šlechtitelů 11, CZ-78371 Olomouc, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 190104-6084, USA.
5
Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Gent, Belgium. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Gent, Belgium.
6
Laboratory of Systems and Synthetic Biology, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands.
7
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 2, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands. TI Food and Nutrition, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands.
8
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 2, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands.
9
Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC), Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, SLU, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
10
Laboratory of Systems and Synthetic Biology, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands. dolf.weijers@wur.nl christian.fleck@wur.nl.
11
Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands. dolf.weijers@wur.nl christian.fleck@wur.nl.

Abstract

Coordination of cell division and pattern formation is central to tissue and organ development, particularly in plants where walls prevent cell migration. Auxin and cytokinin are both critical for division and patterning, but it is unknown how these hormones converge upon tissue development. We identify a genetic network that reinforces an early embryonic bias in auxin distribution to create a local, nonresponding cytokinin source within the root vascular tissue. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that these cells act as a tissue organizer by positioning the domain of oriented cell divisions. We further demonstrate that the auxin-cytokinin interaction acts as a spatial incoherent feed-forward loop, which is essential to generate distinct hormonal response zones, thus establishing a stable pattern within a growing vascular tissue.

PMID:
25104393
DOI:
10.1126/science.1255215
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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