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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Nov;23(11):2447-54. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0247. Epub 2014 Aug 7.

Leukocyte telomere length in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
2
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health team, Villejuif, France. Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. IGR, Villejuif, France.
4
Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino, Italy.
5
Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
6
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece.
7
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Harokopio University of Athens, Greece.
8
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
9
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.
10
Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
11
Unit of Nutrition, Environment, and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain.
12
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (Granada.ibs), Granada, Spain. CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain.
13
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, Murcia, Spain.
14
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
15
Public Health Direction and Biodonostia-Ciberesp Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain.
16
University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
17
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
18
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, ISPO, Florence, Italy.
19
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
20
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy.
21
Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
22
Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.
23
Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
24
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
25
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
26
Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö Sweden.
27
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
28
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
29
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
30
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland.
31
International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France.
32
Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
33
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. r.kaaks@dkfz.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several studies have examined leukocyte telomere length (LTL) as a possible predictor for cancer at various organ sites. The hypothesis originally motivating many of these studies was that shorter telomeres would be associated with an increase in cancer risk; the results of epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent, however, and suggested positive, negative, or null associations. Two studies have addressed the association of LTL in relation to pancreatic cancer risk and the results are contrasting.

METHODS:

We measured LTL in a prospective study of 331 pancreatic cancer cases and 331 controls in the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

RESULTS:

We observed that the mean LTL was higher in cases (0.59 ± 0.20) than in controls (0.57 ± 0.17), although this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07), and a basic logistic regression model showed no association of LTL with pancreas cancer risk. When adjusting for levels of HbA1c and C-peptide, however, there was a weakly positive association between longer LTL and pancreatic cancer risk [OR, 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.27]. Additional analyses by cubic spline regression suggested a possible nonlinear relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk (P = 0.022), with a statistically nonsignificant increase in risk at very low LTL, as well as a significant increase at high LTL.

CONCLUSION:

Taken together, the results from our study do not support LTL as a uniform and strong predictor of pancreatic cancer.

IMPACT:

The results of this article can provide insights into telomere dynamics and highlight the complex relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk.

PMID:
25103821
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0247
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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