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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Dec 15;220(1-2):500-6. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.05.054. Epub 2014 Jun 6.

Risk factors across the eating disorders.

Author information

1
Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Philipp-Rosenthal-Strasse 27, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: anja.hilbert@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Oxford University, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK.
6
Graduate School of Education & Allied Professions, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT, USA.
7
Department of Psychology, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, USA.

Abstract

This study sought to examine risk and onset patterns in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Women with AN (n=71), BN (n=66), BED (n=160) and non-psychiatric controls (n=323) were compared retrospectively on risk factors, symptom onset, and diagnostic migration. Eating disorder groups reported greater risk exposure than non-psychiatric controls. AN and BED differed on premorbid personality/behavioral problems, childhood obesity, and family overeating. Risk factors for BN were shared with AN and BED. Dieting was the most common onset symptom in AN, whereas binge eating was most common in BN and BED. Migration between AN and BED was rare, but more frequent between AN and BN and between BN and BED. AN and BED have distinct risk factors and onset patterns, while BN shares similar risk factors and onset patterns with both AN and BED. Results should inform future classification schemes and prevention programs.

KEYWORDS:

Anorexia nervosa; Binge eating disorder; Bulimia nervosa; Eating disorders; Risk factors

PMID:
25103674
PMCID:
PMC4785871
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2014.05.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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