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Conserv Biol. 2015 Feb;29(1):54-60. doi: 10.1111/cobi.12377. Epub 2014 Aug 7.

Legal ivory trade in a corrupt world and its impact on African elephant populations.

Author information

1
Wildlife Conservation Society, 2300 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, NY 10460, U.S.A.. ebennett@wcs.org.

Abstract

Illegal hunting of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) for ivory is causing rapid declines in their populations. Since 2007, illegal ivory trade has more than doubled. African elephants are facing the most serious conservation crisis since 1989, when international trade was banned. One solution proposed is establishment of a controlled legal trade in ivory. High prices for ivory mean that the incentives to obtain large quantities are high, but the quantity of tusks available for trade are biologically constrained. Within that context, effective management of a legal ivory trade would require robust systems to be in place to ensure that ivory from illegally killed elephants cannot be laundered into a legal market. At present, that is not feasible due to corruption among government officials charged with implementing wildlife-related legislation. With organized criminal enterprises involved along the whole commodity chain, corruption enables the laundering of illegal ivory into legal or potentially legal markets. Poachers and traffickers can rapidly pay their way out of trouble, so the financial incentives to break the law heavily outweigh those of abiding by it. Maintaining reliable permitting systems and leak-proof chains of custody in this context is challenging, and effective management breaks down. Once illegal ivory has entered the legal trade, it is difficult or impossible for enforcement officers to know what is legal and illegal. Addressing corruption throughout a trade network that permeates countries across the globe will take decades, if it can ever be achieved. That will be too late for wild African elephants at current rates of loss. If we are to conserve remaining wild populations, we must close all markets because, under current levels of corruption, they cannot be controlled in a way that does not provide opportunities for illegal ivory being laundered into legal markets.

KEYWORDS:

comercio de vida silvestre; corrupción; corruption; crimen organizado; ivory; marfil; organized crime; wildlife trade

PMID:
25103555
DOI:
10.1111/cobi.12377
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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