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Patient Educ Couns. 2014 Oct;97(1):122-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2014.07.003. Epub 2014 Jul 24.

Effectiveness of a patient education intervention in enhancing the self-efficacy of hospitalized patients to recognize and report acute deteriorating conditions.

Author information

1
Singapore General Hospital, Singapore.
2
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Australia.
3
Department of Medicine, Waikato Hospital and University of Auckland, New Zealand.
4
National University Hospital, Singapore.
5
Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. Electronic address: nurliaw@nus.edu.sg.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To develop and pilot test the effectiveness of a patient education intervention in enhancing the self-efficacy of hospitalized patients to recognize and report symptoms of acute deteriorating conditions.

METHOD:

Using cluster randomization, acute care general wards were randomized to the experimental and control groups. 34 patients in the experimental group received a 30-minute patient education intervention on Alert Worsening conditions And Report Early (AWARE) while 33 patients in the control group received the routine care only. Levels of self-efficacy to recognize and report symptoms were measured before and after the intervention.

RESULTS:

The level of self-efficacy reported by the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

The AWARE intervention was effective in enhancing the self-efficacy of hospitalized patients to recognize and report acute deteriorating conditions.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Patient engagement through patient education could be included in the rapid response system which aims to reduce hospital mortality and cardiac arrest rates in the general wards.

KEYWORDS:

Deterioration; Patient education; Recognize and report symptoms

PMID:
25103182
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2014.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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