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J Neurosci Methods. 2015 Apr 15;244:85-93. doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2014.07.016. Epub 2014 Aug 4.

First-in-man demonstration of a fully implanted myoelectric sensors system to control an advanced electromechanical prosthetic hand.

Author information

1
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, United States. Electronic address: Paul.F.Pasquina.mil@health.mil.
2
The Alfred Mann Foundation, United States.
3
The Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, United States.
4
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, United States.
5
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, United States.
6
Advanced Arm Dynamics, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Advanced motorized prosthetic devices are currently controlled by EMG signals generated by residual muscles and recorded by surface electrodes on the skin. These surface recordings are often inconsistent and unreliable, leading to high prosthetic abandonment rates for individuals with upper limb amputation. Surface electrodes are limited because of poor skin contact, socket rotation, residual limb sweating, and their ability to only record signals from superficial muscles, whose function frequently does not relate to the intended prosthetic function. More sophisticated prosthetic devices require a stable and reliable interface between the user and robotic hand to improve upper limb prosthetic function.

NEW METHOD:

Implantable Myoelectric Sensors (IMES(®)) are small electrodes intended to detect and wirelessly transmit EMG signals to an electromechanical prosthetic hand via an electro-magnetic coil built into the prosthetic socket. This system is designed to simultaneously capture EMG signals from multiple residual limb muscles, allowing the natural control of multiple degrees of freedom simultaneously.

RESULTS:

We report the status of the first FDA-approved clinical trial of the IMES(®) System. This study is currently in progress, limiting reporting to only preliminary results.

COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHODS:

Our first subject has reported the ability to accomplish a greater variety and complexity of tasks in his everyday life compared to what could be achieved with his previous myoelectric prosthesis.

CONCLUSION:

The interim results of this study indicate the feasibility of utilizing IMES(®) technology to reliably sense and wirelessly transmit EMG signals from residual muscles to intuitively control a three degree-of-freedom prosthetic arm.

KEYWORDS:

IMES(®); Implantable devices; Implantable electrodes; Myoelectric; Prosthesis

PMID:
25102286
PMCID:
PMC4317373
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneumeth.2014.07.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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