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Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Aug 7;11:E134. doi: 10.5888/pcd11.140065.

Individual, family, and community predictors of overweight and obesity among colombian children and adolescents.

Author information

1
Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Rd NE, 7000H, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: igonza2@emory.edu.
2
Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
3
Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
4
Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Information from high-income countries is often used to design childhood obesity prevention interventions in low- and middle-income countries, even though determinants may differ greatly between settings.

METHODS:

We examined the associations of individual, family (household), and community (municipality) characteristics with body mass index (BMI) z scores and likelihood of overweight among children aged 5 to 18 years measured for the Colombian National Nutrition surveys of 2005 (n = 9,119) and 2010 (n = 21,520). We used 3-level hierarchical linear models with child as level 1, household as level 2, and municipality as level 3.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of combined overweight and obesity among Colombian children and adolescents was 15.7% in 2005 and 16.6% in 2010. The household level explained 40% in 2005 and 31% in 2010 of the variability in BMI z scores. Wealth was positively associated with BMI in 2005 (0.09 increase in z score per wealth quintile) and 2010 (0.13 increase in z score per wealth quintile) (P < .01). Children and adolescents from extended families had higher BMI z scores than those from nuclear families; BMI z scores were inversely associated with the number of family members living in the same household. The municipality level explained only between 2% and 3% of the variability in BMI. Income inequality was positively associated with BMI z scores in 2010.

CONCLUSION:

These patterns differ from those commonly described in high-income countries and suggest more appropriate opportunities for interventions to prevent child and adolescent obesity in Colombia and other Latin American settings and populations.

PMID:
25101491
DOI:
10.5888/pcd11.140065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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