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Biol Reprod. 2014 Nov;91(5):127. doi: 10.1095/biolreprod.114.120063. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

High-fat diet induces significant metabolic disorders in a mouse model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Reproductive Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China kangjihong@bjmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common female endocrinopathy associated with both reproductive and metabolic disorders. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is currently used to induce a PCOS mouse model. High-fat diet (HFD) has been shown to cause obesity and infertility in female mice. The possible effect of an HFD on the phenotype of DHEA-induced PCOS mice is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate both reproductive and metabolic features of DHEA-induced PCOS mice fed a normal chow or a 60% HFD. Prepubertal C57BL/6 mice (age 25 days) on the normal chow or an HFD were injected (s.c.) daily with the vehicle sesame oil or DHEA for 20 consecutive days. At the end of the experiment, both reproductive and metabolic characteristics were assessed. Our data show that an HFD did not affect the reproductive phenotype of DHEA-treated mice. The treatment of HFD, however, caused significant metabolic alterations in DHEA-treated mice, including obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and pronounced liver steatosis. These findings suggest that HFD induces distinct metabolic features in DHEA-induced PCOS mice. The combined DHEA and HFD treatment may thus serve as a means of studying the mechanisms involved in metabolic derangements of this syndrome, particularly in the high prevalence of hepatic steatosis in women with PCOS.

KEYWORDS:

dehydroepiandrosterone; female infertility; high-fat diet; metabolic disorders; polycystic ovary syndrome

PMID:
25100714
DOI:
10.1095/biolreprod.114.120063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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