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Clin Med (Lond). 2014 Aug;14(4):367-70. doi: 10.7861/clinmedicine.14-4-367.

The extensive inpatient burden of diabetes and diabetes-related foot disease in Barbados.

Author information

1
University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados charles.taylor@cavehill.uwi.edu.
2
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, St Michael, Barbados.
3
Tropical Medicine Research Institute, University of the West Indies, Barbados.
4
University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados.
5
Diabetes Centre, Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich, UK.

Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the burden and quality of adult inpatient diabetes care in Barbados. Inpatients were reviewed over 2 days to identify those with diabetes. Data were collected and analysed from identified patients, their notes and management charts using an audit methodology developed in the UK. Inpatient diabetes prevelance was found to be 42.5% (111 of 261 beds audited). Insulin-treated type 2 diabetes affected 41.8% of the patients. Diabetic foot disease accounted for 30% of admissions and 89% of diabetes-related admissions. Of the patients admitted without diabetic foot disease, 13.9% had their feet examined and 2.8% developed foot lesions during their stay. Medication errors were experienced by 41.4% of patients. We recorded the prevalence of inpatient diabetes in the English medical literature (42.5%) and this was significantly driven by diabetic foot disease. Care needs were complex and areas of potential improvement were identified.

KEYWORDS:

Inpatient diabetes; diabetes education; foot disease; inpatient audit

PMID:
25099836
PMCID:
PMC4952828
DOI:
10.7861/clinmedicine.14-4-367
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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