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J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Aug 6;106(8). pii: dju185. doi: 10.1093/jnci/dju185. Print 2014 Aug.

25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels and survival in advanced pancreatic cancer: findings from CALGB 80303 (Alliance).

Author information

1
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (KVL, APV); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, NC (KO, DN); Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (KO, CJ, DN); The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL (HLK); Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (MFM); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (EMO); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (CF); University of North Carolina Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (FI) katherine.vanloon@ucsf.edu.
2
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (KVL, APV); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, NC (KO, DN); Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (KO, CJ, DN); The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL (HLK); Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (MFM); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (EMO); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (CF); University of North Carolina Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (FI).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Data from animal and cell-line models suggest that vitamin D metabolism plays an important role in pancreatic tumor behavior. Although vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in numerous cancers, the vitamin D status of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and the effect of baseline vitamin D levels on survival are unknown.

METHODS:

Participants in this correlative study (CALGB 151006) were enrolled in CALGB 80303, which was a randomized trial of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer that demonstrated no difference in overall survival (OS) among patients treated with gemcitabine plus placebo vs gemcitabine plus bevacizumab. We measured baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels and examined associations between baseline 25(OH)D levels and progression-free survival and OS using the Cox rank score test. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS:

Of 256 patients with available serum, the median 25(OH)D level was 21.7ng/mL (range 4 to 77). 44.5% of patients were vitamin D deficient (25[OH]D <20ng/mL), and 32.4% were insufficient (25[OH]D ≥20 and <30ng/mL). 25(OH)D levels were lower in black patients compared with white patients, and patients of other/undisclosed race (10.7 vs 22.4 vs 20.9ng/mL, P < .001). Baseline 25(OH)D levels were not associated with PFS (HR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.01, P = .60) or OS (HR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.01, P = .95).

CONCLUSION:

Vitamin D deficiency was highly prevalent among patients with a new diagnosis of advanced pancreatic cancer. Black patients had statistically significantly lower 25(OH)D levels than white patients. In this cohort of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, baseline 25(OH)D levels were not associated with PFS or OS.

PMID:
25099612
PMCID:
PMC4155431
DOI:
10.1093/jnci/dju185
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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