Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Dec 1;59(11):1567-73. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciu633. Epub 2014 Aug 5.

Both Lewis and secretor status mediate susceptibility to rotavirus infections in a rotavirus genotype-dependent manner.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular Virology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Faculty, Linköping University, Sweden.
2
Department of Microbiology, University of León, Nicaragua.
3
Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.
4
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Centre de Recherche Biomoléculaire Pietro Annigoni Saint Camille CERBA/LABIOGENE, Université de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
6
Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The live oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines have shown a reduced efficacy in Africa. Recent in vitro studies have shown binding of the RV surface protein (VP4) to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in an RV genotype-dependent manner, suggesting them to be putative receptors for RV. The diversity of HBGA phenotypes in different ethnic populations, combined with prevalence/absence of specific RV genotypes, led us to hypothesize whether the genetic variations in HBGAs in a population limit susceptibility to certain RV genotypes, plausibly leading to reduced vaccine efficacy.

METHODS:

Association between HBGAs status and susceptibility to RV P genotypes was investigated in children in Burkina Faso and Nicaragua. In total, 242 children with diarrhea in Burkina Faso and Nicaragua were investigated, 93 of whom were RV positive.

RESULTS:

In Burkina Faso, the P[8] RV strains (n = 27) infected only Lewis- and secretor-positive children (27/27; P < .0001), but no Lewis-negative children. In contrast, the P[6] strains (n = 27) infected predominantly Lewis-negative children (n = 18; P < .0001) but also Lewis-positive children, irrespective of their secretor status. The results from Nicaragua confirmed that all P[8]-infected children (n = 22) were secretor Lewis positive.

CONCLUSIONS:

As VP4 of genotype P[8] is a component of current RV vaccines, our finding that Lewis-negative children are resistant to P[8] strains provides a plausible explanation for the reduced vaccine efficacy in populations with a high percentage of Lewis-negative individuals, such as in Africa. Furthermore, our findings provide a plausible explanation as to why P[6] RV strains are more common in Africa.

KEYWORDS:

Lewis; histo–blood group antigen; rotavirus; susceptibility; vaccine

PMID:
25097083
PMCID:
PMC4650770
DOI:
10.1093/cid/ciu633
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center