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Cancer Epidemiol. 2014 Oct;38(5):538-43. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2014.07.004. Epub 2014 Aug 3.

Birth weight and subsequent risk of cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, 145 North Riverside Drive, S471 CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
2
Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, 145 North Riverside Drive, S422 CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
3
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 3939 Woodward Avenue, Room 319, Detroit, MI 48201, United States.
4
Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, 145 North Riverside Drive, S455 CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
5
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, 270 Farber Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214, United States.
6
Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Vanderbilt University, 2213 Garland Avenue, Nashville, TN 37232, United States.
7
Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, 145 North Riverside Drive, S427 CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
8
Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, 145 North Riverside Drive, S425 CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
9
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 900 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, United States.
10
Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 608 North Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611, United States; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 303 East Superior Street, Chicago, IL 60611, United States.
11
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California at Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, United States.
12
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, 1124 West Carson Street, Torrance, CA 90502, United States.
13
Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, 145 North Riverside Drive, CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States. Electronic address: kelli-ryckman@uiowa.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We aimed to determine the association between self-reported birth weight and incident cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study cohort, a large multiethnic cohort of postmenopausal women.

METHODS:

65,850 women reported their birth weight by category (<6 lbs, 6-7 lbs 15 oz, 8-9 lbs 15 oz, and ≥10 lbs). All self-reported, incident cancers were adjudicated by study staff. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate crude and adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for associations between birth weight and: (1) all cancer sites combined, (2) gynecologic cancers, and (3) several site-specific cancer sites.

RESULTS:

After adjustments, birth weight was positively associated with the risk of lung cancer (p=0.01), and colon cancer (p=0.04). An inverse trend was observed between birth weight and risk for leukemia (p=0.04). A significant trend was not observed with breast cancer risk (p=0.67); however, women born weighing ≥10 lbs were less likely to develop breast cancer compared to women born between 6 lbs-7 lbs 15 oz (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.63, 0.94).

CONCLUSION:

Birth weight category appears to be significantly associated with the risk of any postmenopausal incident cancer, though the direction of the association varies by cancer type.

KEYWORDS:

Birth weight; Breast neoplasms; Colorectal neoplasms; Endometrial neoplasms; Leukemia; Lung neoplasms; Neoplasms; Ovarian neoplasms

PMID:
25096278
PMCID:
PMC4188724
DOI:
10.1016/j.canep.2014.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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