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PLoS One. 2014 Aug 5;9(8):e102933. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0102933. eCollection 2014.

"Let's talk about sex": a qualitative study of Rwandan adolescents' views on sex and HIV.

Author information

1
Rinda Ubuzima, Kigali, Rwanda.
2
Department of Global Health and Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Pediatrics, Kigali University Teaching Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda.
3
Department of Global Health and Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Rinda Ubuzima, Kigali, Rwanda; Department of Global Health and Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Rinda Ubuzima, Kigali, Rwanda; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Faisal Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda.
6
Center for Social Science and Global Health, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
7
Treatment and Research on HIV/AIDS Center, Kigali, Rwanda.
8
Department of Global Health and Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Utrecht University Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
9
Department of Global Health and Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Utrecht University Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Biomedical Research, Epidemiology Unit, Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This qualitative study explored the views and experiences of adolescents with perinatally acquired HIV in Kigali, Rwanda, regarding sex, love, marriage, children and hope for the future.

DESIGN:

The study enrolled 42 adolescents who had received combination antiretroviral therapy for at least 12 months, and a selection of their primary caregivers. Study methods included 3 multiple day workshops consisting of role-playing and focus group discussions (FGDs) with adolescents, 8 in-depth interviews with adolescents, and one FGD with caregivers.

RESULTS:

The adolescents reported experiencing similar sexual needs and dilemmas as most other adolescents, but with an added layer of complexity due to fears related to HIV transmission and/or rejection by partners. They desired more advice from their parents/caregivers on these topics. Although they struggled with aspects of sex, love, marriage and having children, most agreed that they would find love, be married and have children in the future. The two most discussed HIV-related anxieties were how and when to disclose to a (potential) sex/marriage partner and whether to have children. However, most adolescents felt that they had a right to love and be loved, and were aware of prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT) options in Rwanda. Adolescents generally spoke about their future role in society in a positive manner.

CONCLUSION:

Strengthening the life skills of HIV-positive adolescents, especially around HIV disclosure and reduction of HIV transmission, as well as the support skills of parents/caregivers, may not only reduce onward HIV transmission but also improve quality of life by reducing anxiety.

PMID:
25093572
PMCID:
PMC4122382
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0102933
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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