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Mol Cell Biol. 2014 Oct;34(20):3828-42. doi: 10.1128/MCB.01646-13. Epub 2014 Aug 4.

BRCA1 pathway function in basal-like breast cancer cells.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
4
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA david_livingston@dfci.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Sporadic basal-like cancers (BLCs) are a common subtype of breast cancer that share multiple biological properties with BRCA1-mutated breast tumors. Despite being BRCA1(+/+), sporadic BLCs are widely viewed as phenocopies of BRCA1-mutated breast cancers, because they are hypothesized to manifest a BRCA1 functional defect or breakdown of a pathway(s) in which BRCA1 plays a major role. The role of BRCA1 in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination (HR) is its best understood function and the function most often implicated in BRCA1 breast cancer suppression. Therefore, it is suspected that sporadic BLCs exhibit a defect in HR. To test this hypothesis, multiple DNA damage repair assays focused on several types of repair were performed on a group of cell lines classified as sporadic BLCs and on controls. The sporadic BLC cell lines failed to exhibit an overt HR defect. Rather, they exhibited defects in the repair of stalled replication forks, another BRCA1 function. These results provide insight into why clinical trials of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which require an HR defect for efficacy, have been unsuccessful in sporadic BLCs, unlike cisplatin, which elicits DNA damage that requires stalled fork repair and has shown efficacy in sporadic BLCs.

PMID:
25092866
PMCID:
PMC4187718
DOI:
10.1128/MCB.01646-13
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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