Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2014 Aug 5;9:127. doi: 10.1186/s13023-014-0127-3.

Prevalence and risk factors of vitamin D deficiency in inherited ichthyosis: a French prospective observational study performed in a reference center.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To date, few studies have investigated serum vitamin D status in patients with inherited ichthyosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (defined as serum level <10 ng/mL) in a French cohort of patients and to identify associated risk factors.

METHODS:

This was a prospective observational study performed in a hospital reference center with expertise for rare skin diseases. Patients' clinical characteristics were recorded. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone were determined. For patients with vitamin D deficiency, serum calcium, serum phosphorus and bone mineral density were also investigated. Comparisons between groups (25-hydroxyvitamin D <10 ng/mL versus ≥10 ng/mL) were conducted by univariate and multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Of the 53 included patients, 47 (88.7%) had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D below the optimal level of 30 ng/mL: 18 (34%) had vitamin D sufficiency, 14 (26.4%) had vitamin D insufficiency, and 15 (28.3%) had vitamin D deficiency. A negative linear correlation was found between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels for the whole study population. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were normal for the 15 patients with vitamin D deficiency. Bone mineral density was investigated for 11 of these latter 15 patients, and six of them had osteopenia. Winter/spring seasons of vitamin D measurement, severity of ichthyosis, and phototypes IV-VI were identified as independent risk factors for vitamin D deficiency.

CONCLUSIONS:

Clinicians should be aware of the risk of vitamin D deficiency in the management of patients with inherited ichthyosis, especially in winter and spring, and in case of dark skin or severe disease.

PMID:
25091406
PMCID:
PMC4237956
DOI:
10.1186/s13023-014-0127-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center