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Stem Cell Res. 2014 Nov;13(3 Pt B):705-14. doi: 10.1016/j.scr.2014.06.004. Epub 2014 Jul 9.

Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation.

Author information

1
Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute/EMBL Australia, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia. Electronic address: alex.pinto@monash.edu.
2
Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute/EMBL Australia, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia.
3
Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute/EMBL Australia, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia; National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, W12 0NN, UK.

Abstract

Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

PMID:
25087895
DOI:
10.1016/j.scr.2014.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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