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Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2014 Sep 30;76:2-20. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2014.07.011. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

New radiotracers for imaging of vascular targets in angiogenesis-related diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, WI, USA. Electronic address: hhong@uwhealth.org.
2
Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, WI, USA.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, MD, USA.
4
Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, WI, USA; Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, WI, USA; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI, USA. Electronic address: wcai@uwhealth.org.

Abstract

Tremendous advances over the last several decades in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allow for targeted imaging of molecular and cellular events in the living systems. Angiogenesis, a multistep process regulated by the network of different angiogenic factors, has attracted world-wide interests, due to its pivotal role in the formation and progression of different diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and inflammation. In this review article, we will summarize the recent progress in PET or SPECT imaging of a wide variety of vascular targets in three major angiogenesis-related diseases: cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation. Faster drug development and patient stratification for a specific therapy will become possible with the facilitation of PET or SPECT imaging and it will be critical for the maximum benefit of patients.

KEYWORDS:

Angiogenesis; Cancer; Cardiovascular disease; Inflammation; Positron emission tomography (PET); Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

PMID:
25086372
PMCID:
PMC4169744
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2014.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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