Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Appl Nurs Res. 2015 May;28(2):210-2. doi: 10.1016/j.apnr.2014.06.002. Epub 2014 Jul 2.

The implications of nurse resources on cardiac care in the emergency department.

Author information

1
New Jersey Collaborating Center for Nursing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, School of Nursing, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. Electronic address: mjohanse@rutgers.edu.
2
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, School of Nursing, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. Electronic address: pam.decordova@rutgers.edu.
3
New Jersey Collaborating Center for Nursing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, School of Nursing, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. Electronic address: xmbjowl@rutgers.edu.
4
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, School of Nursing, Newark, NJ 07102. Electronic address: emiguel.martinez1@rutgers.edu.
5
University of Florida, College of Nursing, Gainesville, FL 32610; Florida Blue Center for Health Care Access, Patient Safety and Quality Outcomes, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610. Electronic address: jcimiotti@ufl.edu.

Abstract

During a stay in the emergency department the treatment that cardiac patients receive can have a significant effect on health outcomes; yet, little is known about the process of care in emergency departments. In this study we examined the effect of nurse resources on the process of care in all New Jersey hospital-based emergency departments. Patient-to-nurse ratio, nurse skill mix, and Magnet accreditation were associated with aspirin on arrival and percutaneous coronary intervention within 90 minutes of arrival.

KEYWORDS:

Magnet; Nurse resources; Process of care

PMID:
25085809
DOI:
10.1016/j.apnr.2014.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center