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Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:147-53. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.029. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

Adverse childhood experiences, dispositional mindfulness, and adult health.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: rwhitaker@temple.edu.
2
Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
3
Child Trends, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
5
Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether greater dispositional mindfulness is associated with better adult health across a range of exposures to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).

METHODS:

In 2012, a web-based survey of 2160 Pennsylvania Head Start staff was conducted. We assessed ACE score (count of eight categories of childhood adversity), dispositional mindfulness (Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale-Revised), and the prevalence of three outcomes: multiple health conditions (≥ 3 of 7 conditions), poor health behavior (≥ 2 of 5 behaviors), and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) (≥ 2 of 5 indicators).

RESULTS:

Respondents were 97% females, and 23% reported ≥ 3 ACEs. The prevalences of multiple health conditions, poor health behavior, and poor HRQOL were 29%, 21%, and 13%, respectively. At each level of ACE exposure, health outcomes were better in those with greater mindfulness. For example, among persons reporting ≥ 3 ACEs, those in the highest quartile of mindfulness had a prevalence of multiple health conditions two-thirds that of those in the lowest quartile (adjusted prevalence ratio (95% confidence interval)=0.66 (0.51, 0.86)); for those reporting no ACEs, the ratio was 0.62 (0.41, 0.94).

CONCLUSION:

Across a range of exposures to ACEs, greater dispositional mindfulness was associated with fewer health conditions, better health behavior, and better HRQOL.

KEYWORDS:

Child abuse; Child maltreatment; Child neglect; Chronic disease; Health behavior; Mindfulness; Quality of life; Stress, Psychological

PMID:
25084563
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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