Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2014 Jul-Aug;57(1):111-24. doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2014.03.003. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

Author information

1
Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.
2
Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY. Electronic address: Partho.sengupta@mountsinai.org.

Abstract

Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac dysfunction; Cardiac mechanics; Cardiomyopathy; Heart failure

PMID:
25081406
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcad.2014.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center