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J Neurosci. 2014 Jul 30;34(31):10339-46. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0108-14.2014.

Plasticity in the human speech motor system drives changes in speech perception.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1B1, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom, WC1N 3BG.
2
GIPSA-LAB, Département Parole and Cognition, CNRS and Grenoble Université, Grenoble, France.
3
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1B1.
4
School of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3N 1X7, Research Center, Sainte-Justine Hospital, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1C5, Centre for Research on Brain, Language & Music, Montréal, Canada H3G 2A8, and.
5
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1B1, Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 david.ostry@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

Recent studies of human speech motor learning suggest that learning is accompanied by changes in auditory perception. But what drives the perceptual change? Is it a consequence of changes in the motor system? Or is it a result of sensory inflow during learning? Here, subjects participated in a speech motor-learning task involving adaptation to altered auditory feedback and they were subsequently tested for perceptual change. In two separate experiments, involving two different auditory perceptual continua, we show that changes in the speech motor system that accompany learning drive changes in auditory speech perception. Specifically, we obtained changes in speech perception when adaptation to altered auditory feedback led to speech production that fell into the phonetic range of the speech perceptual tests. However, a similar change in perception was not observed when the auditory feedback that subjects' received during learning fell into the phonetic range of the perceptual tests. This indicates that the central motor outflow associated with vocal sensorimotor adaptation drives changes to the perceptual classification of speech sounds.

KEYWORDS:

action; motor learning; perception; plasticity; speech

PMID:
25080594
PMCID:
PMC4115140
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0108-14.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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