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Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2015 Apr;31:1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2014.05.004. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

LFP and oscillations-what do they tell us?

Author information

1
The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: k.friston@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Center for Neuroscience and Center for Mind and Brain, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95618, USA; Ernst Strüngmann Institute in Cooperation with Max Planck Society, Deutschordenstraße 46, 60528 Frankfurt, Germany.
3
The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.

Abstract

This review surveys recent trends in the use of local field potentials-and their non-invasive counterparts-to address the principles of functional brain architectures. In particular, we treat oscillations as the (observable) signature of context-sensitive changes in synaptic efficacy that underlie coordinated dynamics and message-passing in the brain. This rich source of information is now being exploited by various procedures-like dynamic causal modelling-to test hypotheses about neuronal circuits in health and disease. Furthermore, the roles played by neuromodulatory mechanisms can be addressed directly through their effects on oscillatory phenomena. These neuromodulatory or gain control processes are central to many theories of normal brain function (e.g. attention) and the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric conditions (e.g. Parkinson's disease).

PMID:
25079053
PMCID:
PMC4376394
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2014.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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