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Curr Opin Microbiol. 2014 Oct;21:13-7. doi: 10.1016/j.mib.2014.06.017. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address: evgeny.nudler@nyumc.org.

Abstract

In recent decades, there has been growing interest in the field of gasotransmitters, endogenous gaseous signaling molecules (NO, H2S, and CO), as regulators of a multitude of biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Most of the concerted effort has been on eukaryotic gasotransmitters until the subsequent discovery of bacterial counterparts. While the fundamental aspects of bacterial gasotransmitters remain undefined and necessitate further research, we will discuss a known specific role they play in defense against antibiotics. Considering the current dilemma of multidrug-resistant bacteria we consider it particularly prudent to exploring novel targets and approaches, of which the bacterial gasotransmitters, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide represent.

PMID:
25078319
DOI:
10.1016/j.mib.2014.06.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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