Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Nov;18(16):2943-51. doi: 10.1017/S1368980014001414. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

Food security status among grade 5 students in Nova Scotia, Canada and its association with health outcomes.

Author information

1
1School of Health and Human Performance,Dalhousie University,PO Box 15000,Halifax,NS B3H 4R2,Canada.
2
3Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit,Dalhousie University,Halifax,NS,Canada.
3
5Department of Nutrition and Dietetics,Mount Saint Vincent University,Halifax,NS,Canada.
4
4School of Public Health,University of Alberta,Edmonton,AB,Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Food security (FS) exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their needs. The present research sought to determine whether students from households experiencing moderate or severe food insecurity (FI) had poorer diet quality, higher body weights and poorer psychosocial outcomes than students from households classed as having high FS or marginal FI status.

DESIGN:

Population-based survey conducted in schools. Multiple regression analysis was used to explore associations between FS status (high FS; marginal, moderate, severe FI), dietary behaviours and intake, and health-related outcomes (body weight, quality of life, mood, peer relationships, externalizing problems).

SETTING:

Nova Scotia, Canada.

SUBJECTS:

Grade 5 students (n 5853), aged 10-11 years, with complete information on FS status and student outcomes.

RESULTS:

In this sample, rates of household FS were 73·5% (high FS), 8·3% (marginal FI) 10·2% (moderate FI) and 7·1% (severe FI status). Students living in households experiencing moderate or severe FI had poorer diet quality, higher BMI and poorer psychosocial outcomes than students classed as having high FS or marginal FI.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings provide important evidence for policy makers on the prevalence of FI among families in Nova Scotia with grade 5 children and its relationship with childhood nutrition, psychosocial and quality of life factors, and weight status.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Diet quality; Food insecurity; Food security; Health outcomes; Psychosocial factors; Quality of life; Schools; Weight status

PMID:
25075606
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980014001414
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center