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Alzheimers Dement. 2015 May;11(5):541-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.05.1752. Epub 2014 Jul 26.

Psychosocial telephone intervention for dementia caregivers: A randomized, controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. Electronic address: gtremont@lifespan.org.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
3
Department of Biostatistics, Center for Statistical Sciences Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA; Department of Neurology, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, UConn Center on Aging, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.
6
Department of Health Services, Policy & Practice, Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Identifying effective and accessible interventions for dementia caregivers is critical as dementia prevalence increases.

OBJECTIVE:

Examine the effects of a telephone-based intervention on caregiver well-being.

DESIGN:

Randomized, controlled trial.

SETTING:

Academic medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Two hundred and fifty distressed, family, dementia caregivers.

INTERVENTION:

Caregivers randomized to receive 16 telephone contacts over 6 months of either the Family Intervention: Telephone Tracking-Caregiver (FITT-C) or Telephone Support (TS).

OUTCOME:

Primary outcome variables were family caregivers' depressive symptoms, burden, and reactions to care recipients' behavior problems at 6 months.

RESULTS:

The FITT-C intervention resulted in significantly improved caregiver depressive symptoms (P = .003; 27% net improvement) and less severe reactions to care-recipient depressive behaviors (P = .009; 29% net improvement) compared with the control condition (TS).

CONCLUSION:

An entirely telephone-based intervention improves caregivers' depressive symptoms and reactions to behavior problems in the care recipient and is comparable with reported results of face-to-face interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Burden; Caregiving; Dementia; Depression; Intervention

PMID:
25074341
PMCID:
PMC4306648
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2014.05.1752
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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