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J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Nov;68(11):1088-95. doi: 10.1136/jech-2014-203998. Epub 2014 Jul 29.

Regional differences in the incidence of self-reported type 2 diabetes in Germany: results from five population-based studies in Germany (DIAB-CORE Consortium).

Author information

1
Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
2
Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany.
3
Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Institute of Health Economics and Health Care Management, Neuherberg, Germany.
4
Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Institute of Epidemiology II, Neuherberg, Germany German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Neuherberg, Germany.
5
Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle(Saale), Germany.
6
Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle(Saale), Germany Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
7
Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
8
Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital of Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany.
9
Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
10
Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany German Center of Cardiovascular Research, Greifswald, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Population-based data are paramount to investigate the long-term course of diabetes, for planning in healthcare and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of primary prevention. We analysed regional differences in the incidence of self-reported type 2 diabetes mellitus in Germany.

METHODS:

Data of participants (baseline age 45-74 years) from five regional population-based studies conducted between 1997 and 2010 were included (mean follow-up 2.2-7.1 years). The incidence of self-reported type 2 diabetes mellitus at follow-up was compared. The incidence rates per 1000 person-years (95% CI) and the cumulative incidence (95% CI) from regional studies were directly standardised to the German population (31 December 2007) and weighted by inverse probability weights for losses to follow-up.

RESULTS:

Of 8787 participants, 521 (5.9%) developed type 2 diabetes mellitus corresponding to an incidence rate of 11.8/1000 person-years (95% CI 10.8 to 12.9). The regional incidence was highest in the East and lowest in the South of Germany with 16.9 (95% CI 13.3 to 21.8) vs 9.3 (95% CI 7.4 to 11.1)/1000 person-years, respectively. The incidence increased with age and was higher in men than in women.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of self-reported type 2 diabetes mellitus shows regional differences within Germany. Prevention measures need to consider sex-specific differences and probably can be more efficiently introduced toward those regions in need.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort studies; Epidemiological methods; Epidemiology of diabetes; GEOGRAPHY

PMID:
25073594
DOI:
10.1136/jech-2014-203998
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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