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Nanomedicine. 2015 Jan;11(1):39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2014.07.005. Epub 2014 Jul 27.

Blood biocompatibility of surface-bound multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: ag2606@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Medicine and Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: santosmm@tcd.ie.
3
School of Chemistry, Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: asatti@leitat.org.
4
Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address: tcmajor@med.umich.edu.
5
Conway Institute of Biomolecular & Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: kieran.wynne@ucd.ie.
6
School of Chemistry and CRANN institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg, Russia. Electronic address: igounko@tcd.ie.
7
Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address: gannich@med.umich.edu.
8
Conway Institute of Biomolecular & Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: giuliano.elia@philochem.ch.
9
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: radomskm@tcd.ie.

Abstract

Blood clots when it contacts foreign surfaces following platelet activation. This can be catastrophic in clinical settings involving extracorporeal circulation such as during heart-lung bypass where blood is circulated in polyvinyl chloride tubing. Studies have shown, however, that surface-bound carbon nanotubes may prevent platelet activation, the initiator of thrombosis. We studied the blood biocompatibility of polyvinyl chloride, surface-modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that surface-bound multi-walled carbon nanotubes cause platelet activation in vitro and devastating thrombosis in an in vivo animal model of extracorporeal circulation. The mechanism of the pro-thrombotic effect likely involves direct multi-walled carbon nanotube-platelet interaction with Ca(2+)-dependant platelet activation. These experiments provide evidence, for the first time, that modification of surfaces with nanomaterials modulates blood biocompatibility in extracorporeal circulation.

KEYWORDS:

Carbon nanotubes; Cardiopulmonary bypass; Coagulation; Extracorporeal life support; Platelets

PMID:
25072378
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2014.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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