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Infect Immun. 2014 Oct;82(10):4182-9. doi: 10.1128/IAI.02368-14. Epub 2014 Jul 28.

Helicobacter pylori infection introduces DNA double-strand breaks in host cells.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Yufu City, Oita, Japan Department of Medicine-Gastroenterology, Baylor College of Medicine, and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA.
2
Department of Molecular Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Yufu City, Oita, Japan.
3
Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Yufu City, Oita, Japan Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Yufu City, Oita, Japan.
4
Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Yufu City, Oita, Japan.
5
Department of Medicine-Gastroenterology, Baylor College of Medicine, and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA.
6
Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Yufu City, Oita, Japan Department of Medicine-Gastroenterology, Baylor College of Medicine, and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA yyamaoka@oita-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Gastric cancer is an inflammation-related malignancy related to long-standing acute and chronic inflammation caused by infection with the human bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Inflammation can result in genomic instability. However, there are considerable data that H. pylori itself can also produce genomic instability both directly and through epigenetic pathways. Overall, the mechanisms of H. pylori-induced host genomic instabilities remain poorly understood. We used microarray screening of H. pylori-infected human gastric biopsy specimens to identify candidate genes involved in H. pylori-induced host genomic instabilities. We found upregulation of ATM expression in vivo in gastric mucosal cells infected with H. pylori. Using gastric cancer cell lines, we confirmed that the H. pylori-related activation of ATM was due to the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs were observed following infection with both cag pathogenicity island (PAI)-positive and -negative strains, but the effect was more robust with cag PAI-positive strains. These results are consistent with the fact that infections with both cag PAI-positive and -negative strains are associated with gastric carcinogenesis, but the risk is higher in individuals infected with cag PAI-positive strains.

PMID:
25069978
PMCID:
PMC4187860
DOI:
10.1128/IAI.02368-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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