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Sci Rep. 2014 Jul 28;4:5856. doi: 10.1038/srep05856.

Carbonaceous particles reduce marine microgel formation.

Author information

1
Department of Marine Environment and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, 80424 Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC.
2
School of Engineering, University of California at Merced, Merced, California, USA.
3
1] Department of Marine Environment and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, 80424 Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC [2] Kuroshio Research Group, Asia-Pacific Ocean Research Center, National Sun Yat-sen University, 80424 Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

An increase in ambient carbonaceous particle (CNP) levels has been found, potentially leading to significant environmental/health hazards. These particles will ultimately enter the oceanic environment and interact with dissolved organic carbon. However, a detailed mechanistic understanding of their behavior, transport, and fate in marine systems is still much needed. This study, using carbon black (CB, 14 nm) nanoparticles as a model, aimed to investigate the impact of CNPs on marine microgel formation, a critical shunt between DOC and particulate organic carbon that potentially represents a ~70-Gt organic carbon flux. We found that CB can enhance the stability of DOC polymers and reduce microgel equilibrium sizes in concentration as low as 1 μgL(-1) CB, possibly due to negative surface charges on CB that decrease cross-linking bridges through Ca(2+) bonds. The reduction of marine microgel formation induced by CB could lead to a decrease in the downward transportation of microbial substrates and nutrients, and therefore, could have a significant impact on the carbon cycle and the marine ecosystem.

PMID:
25068549
PMCID:
PMC4894428
DOI:
10.1038/srep05856
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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