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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Dec 15;220(1-2):201-4. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.018. Epub 2014 Jul 17.

Smell identification in individuals at clinical high risk for schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
School of Social Work, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: cc788@columbia.edu.

Abstract

Smell identification deficits exist in schizophrenia, and may be associated with its negative symptoms. Less is known about smell identification and its clinical correlates in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. We examined smell identification, symptoms and IQ in 71 clinical high-risk (CHR) subjects and 36 healthy controls. Smell identification was assessed using both the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT; Doty, R.L., Shaman, P., Kimmelman, C.P., Dann, M.S., 1984. University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test: a rapid quantitative olfactory function test for the clinic. Laryngoscope 94, 176-178) and its extracted 12-item Brief Smell Identification Test (Goudsmit, N., Coleman, E., Seckinger, R.A., Wolitzky, R., Stanford, A.D., Corcoran, C., Goetz, R.R., Malaspina, D., 2003. A brief smell identification test discriminates between deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research 120, 155-164). Smell identification did not significantly differ between CHR subjects and controls. Among CHR subjects, smell identification did not predict schizophrenia (N=19; 27%) within 2 years, nor was it associated with negative or positive symptoms. This is the third prospective cohort study to examine smell identification in CHR subjects, and overall, findings are inconclusive, similar to what is found for other disorders in adolescents, such as autism spectrum, attention deficit and anxiety disorders. Smell identification deficit may not have clear utility as a marker of emergent schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Negative symptoms; Odor; Olfaction; Prodromal; Prodrome; Schizophrenia; Ultra high risk

PMID:
25066961
PMCID:
PMC4252491
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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