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Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2015 Oct;17 Suppl 2:e352-63. doi: 10.1111/cid.12239. Epub 2014 Jul 26.

The Role of Nicotine in the Corrosive Behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V Dental Implant.

Author information

1
Department of Restorative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Separation and Conversion Technology, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Antwerp, Belgium.
4
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA.
5
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
6
Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
7
Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
8
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Metals react chemically/electrochemically in electrolytic solutions, such as that present in the oral cavity, which leads to corrosion of metal dental implants. Corrosion can increase the failure rate of dental implants.

PURPOSE:

This study evaluated the corrosion behavior of nicotine on Ti-6Al-4V under physiological conditions. It was hypothesized that nicotine in artificial saliva would have an adverse effect on the corrosion of Ti-6Al-4V.

METHODS:

Ti-6Al-4V discs were electrochemically analyzed using a three-electrode electrochemical cell. The disks were immersed in an electrolytic artificial saliva with varying pH (3.0 and 6.5) and nicotine concentration (control, 1 mg/mL, 5 mg/mL, and 20 mg/mL). Open circuit potential, cyclic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were conducted.

RESULTS:

Electrochemical parameters indicated that the presence of nicotine significantly reduced (p < .05) the corrosion rate. For example, there was a decrease in corrosion current density from 2.94 × 10(-3)  μA/cm(2) to 1.43 × 10(-3)  μA/cm(2) in control compared with 20 mg/mL nicotine at pH 6.5. EIS results exhibited an unexpected trend in that the presence of nicotine decreased polarization resistance. This suggested a decrease in passive film growth.

CONCLUSIONS:

At certain concentrations, nicotine inhibits local corrosion; however, it also prevents the formation of a protective oxide film.

KEYWORDS:

corrosion; dental implants; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; nicotine; pH; saliva

PMID:
25066431
DOI:
10.1111/cid.12239
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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