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Psychol Med. 2015 Jan;45(2):247-58. doi: 10.1017/S0033291714000762. Epub 2014 Apr 7.

A meta-analysis of the prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in incarcerated populations.

Author information

1
Centre for Mental Health, Division of Brain Sciences, Department of Medicine,Imperial College London,UK.
2
Caudex Medical,Oxford,UK.
3
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry,King's College London,UK.
4
AMF Consulting,Inc., Los Angeles, CA,USA.
5
Global HEOR,Vertex Pharmaceuticals,Boston, MA,USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies report the variable prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in incarcerated populations. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the prevalence of ADHD in these populations.

METHOD:

Primary research studies reporting the prevalence (lifetime/current) of ADHD in incarcerated populations were identified. The meta-analysis used a mixed log-binomial model, including fixed effects for each covariate and a random study effect, to estimate the significance of various risk factors.

RESULTS:

Forty-two studies were included in the analysis. ADHD prevalence was higher with screening diagnoses versus diagnostic interview (and with retrospective youth diagnoses versus current diagnoses). Using diagnostic interview data, the estimated prevalence was 25.5% and there were no significant differences for gender and age. Significant country differences were noted.

CONCLUSIONS:

Compared with published general population prevalence, there is a fivefold increase in prevalence of ADHD in youth prison populations (30.1%) and a 10-fold increase in adult prison populations (26.2%).

KEYWORDS:

ADHD; crime; diagnosis; incarcerated; offender; prevalence; prison

PMID:
25066071
PMCID:
PMC4301200
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291714000762
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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