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Nat Neurosci. 2014 Oct;17(10):1313-5. doi: 10.1038/nn.3768. Epub 2014 Jul 27.

'Silent' mitral cells dominate odor responses in the olfactory bulb of awake mice.

Author information

1
1] Behavioural Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Division of Neurophysiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, London, UK.
2
1] Behavioural Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
3
1] Behavioural Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Division of Neurophysiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, London, UK. [3] Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. [4] Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London, UK.

Abstract

How wakefulness shapes neural activity is a topic of intense discussion. In the awake olfactory bulb, high activity with weak sensory-evoked responses has been reported in mitral/tufted cells (M/TCs). Using blind whole-cell recordings, we found 33% of M/TCs to be 'silent', yet still show strong sensory responses, with weak or inhibitory responses in 'active' neurons. Thus, a previously missed M/TC subpopulation can exert powerful influence over the olfactory bulb.

PMID:
25064849
PMCID:
PMC4176944
DOI:
10.1038/nn.3768
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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